Dance Studio Owner

Incorporating fitness classes at your dance studio

Steele Pilates at Steps on Broadway. Photo by Paul B. Goode.
Steele Pilates at Steps on Broadway. Photo by Paul B. Goode.

As a studio owner, you’re probably always thinking of ways to keep business strong, increase clientele and maintain status as a successful asset in your community. Have you ever considered that people besides dancers could potentially be clients at your studio? That even those without a dance background – or dancers who are also looking for a little something extra – can benefit from your studio’s offerings? Fitness classes are a great addition to a dance studio’s schedule, as they can increase clientele and revenue.

Morning Fit at Steps on Broadway. Photo courtesy of Steps.

Morning Fit at Steps on Broadway. Photo courtesy of Steps.

Steps on Broadway, for example, offers Pilates, yoga, Lastics Stretch, Gyrokinesis, Zumba, Cardio Dance, BootCamp and Barre, in addition to the hundreds of weekly dance classes. These fitness classes offer exercise options for not only dancers but also recreational dancers, adults, non-dancers and neighborhood locals.

Offering fitness classes “allows our dancers to cross-train if they would like to strengthen their technique,” says Diane Grumet, co-artistic director/managing director of Steps on Broadway. “It also provides exposure to a clientele base that is specifically looking for fitness and living a healthier lifestyle.”

Wedee Kao, director of operations at Steps on Broadway, adds a few reasons to consider integrating fitness classes into your studio’s schedule. “First, you build a bigger, more inclusive community. Second, you offer your dancers a way to keep their body healthy. Finally, it exposes non-dancers to the dance community and art form.”

Thus, the addition of fitness classes can equate to more adult students, more drop-in students and, as a result, more revenue.

When scheduling any fitness classes, consider the time of day. Morning can be a great time for parents who have just dropped off their kids at school and are looking to squeeze in some exercise, for instance. Afternoon can prove to be a convenient time for professional dancers to take a class in between rehearsals. And evening can be a good option for working clientele who look forward to their nighttime workout.

Steele Pilates at Steps on Broadway. Photo by Paul B. Goode.

Steele Pilates at Steps on Broadway. Photo by Paul B. Goode.

“The morning is a great time to offer these classes, as it’s a great way to start the day and get blood flowing,” Grumet elaborates. “Working out also gives you endorphins, and what better way than to start your day feeling good. However, if you are not a morning person, there are many classes offered throughout the day and evening.”

Try surveying your studio parents and see what types of fitness classes they’d be interested in. Or share the importance of cross-training with your dance students and encourage them to sign up for an exercise class like yoga, Gyrokinesis or Pilates. By including these types of classes in your studio’s schedule, you’re not only building stronger, healthier dancers, but you’re also working toward increasing revenue and community presence, making your studio an all-around successful one.

For a full class schedule at Steps on Broadway, visit www.stepsnyc.com

By Laura Di Orio of Dance Informa.

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